tree surgery company

What it takes to provide a top-notch tree surgery service. 

Let’s face it, tree surgery takes knowledge and skill. It should be left to the professionals that have the experience to take on such a complex service. From knowledge about local laws to knowing how to reduce the crown on a tree, this service is varied and quite unique. 

Want to provide the best tree surgery services in the business? Here’s how: 

Knowledge: Make sure you’re in tune with the most up to date local legislation including tree preservation orders, conservation areas etc.

Skills: Having practical skills is essential in providing an exceptional tree surgery service. Tree felling, crown management and stunt maintenance all require practical skills combined with knowledge to ensure that they’re done correctly.  

Qualifications: Having a formal qualification in Arboriculture will give you the edge when it comes to tree surgery. Understanding the plants, and especially the trees, that you’re working with will make your job that much easier and ensure that your customers get good results from your tree surgery services. 

Insurance is a must: Ensure that you have Public Liability Insurance covering all work that’s undertaken, this reduces your risk and ensures your customers have peace of mind. 

Tools: Having the right tools will ensure that all of your knowledge and skills are maximised when you provide a tree surgery service. It also ensures that your service is efficient and safe and the results are of the highest quality. 

OH & S: Ensure that your occupational health and safety practices are on point at all times. There’s nothing like an incident to smear your reputation within the industry.  

Understand what your customer wants: Like any service, ensure that you gather all the required information from your customer and understand what their desired outcome from the tree surgery service is. Cutting down a customer’s favourite tree will lead to a very unhappy customer. 

Need to know more? 

Cloud Landscapes Ltd are expert tree surgeons as well as hedge cutting specialists in Chichester, West Sussex. 

To find out more visit our dedicated Arborist Services page.

Emergency Landscaping & Garden Reconstruction | Boxgrove, Chichester

After a bus crash left this Sussex Garden severely damaged we were asked to make good and reconstruct the areas.

The crash caused huge damage to an old Sussex flint wall and the impact caused glass to shatter all over the front of the property.

For safety and due to the damage caused we had no choice but to start from scratch.

First up we removed all the debris and glass which included excavating the lawn, shingle areas and bedding areas.

Once a blank canvas was re-established we started with installing new wooded shuttering to retain the top soil, new lawn then separated the areas from the planting and shingle sections.

We levelled off the lawn area using topsoil and rakes followed by re-turfing and back filling the flower beds with fresh topsoil.

Finally we re-pruned the damaged trees and removed any damaged branches. New plants and hedges were installed to replace the damaged ones and finally we added back the marine shingle to finish off the pathway areas.

The finished garden looks great alongside the the newly constructed flint wall.

You would never know such a collision took place!

For emergency insurance tree work and landscaping renovations contact Cloud Landscapes Ltd today for a free estimate. 

Landscape Garden Design and Build Project - Yapton, West Sussex - Phase 1

We originally visited this stunning property in 2017. Here are some images of the initial site clearance prior to garden design.

More before and after photos of the clearance...

We then had to wait a few months whilst the tree and conservation applications were approved to further remove larger tree specimens which had been highlighted as dead or dying. A few tree reductions also took place. Watch this space!

Chichester Hedge Cutting and Tree Surgery Services

It is only possible to keep your Chichester hedges looking beautifully manicured with regular garden maintenance? 

Our experienced arborists will be able to identify the plant species for you to ensure the correct timing and extent of the hedge work required. 

By reducing the number of annual cuts you can keep a hedge in check but still enjoy the flower, fruit and autumn colour that the species provide. 

As a rough guide here are some common hedging plants with their tolerance to heavy pruning. If heavy pruning is not an option then more regular trimming will be necessary. Trimming will be very species dependant but here is a rough guide:

  • Beech (Fagus sylvatica): Tolerates relatively hard pruning.
  • Blackthorn (Prunus spinosa) Tolerates very hard pruning).
  • Box (Buxus sempervirens): Tolerates relatively hard pruning.
  • Elaeagnus: Tolerates very hard pruning.
  • Euonymus: Tolerates very hard pruning.
  • Griselinia: Tolerates hard pruning. 
  • Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna): Tolerates very hard pruning.
  • Holly (Ilex aquifolium): Tolerates hard pruning.
  • Holm Oak (Quercus ilex): Tolerates hard pruning.
  • Hornbeam (Carpinus betulus): Tolerates hard pruning.
  • Laurel (Prunus laurocerasus): Tolerates very hard pruning.
  • Lawson Cypress (Chamaecyparis lawsoniana): As a hedging plant it does not tolerate
  • hard pruning.
  • Monterey Cypress (Cupressus macrocarpa): As a hedging plant it does not tolerate
  • hard pruning.
  • Portuguese Laurel (Prunus lusitanica): Tolerates hard pruning.
  • Privet (Ligustrum ovalifolium): Tolerates hard pruning.
  • Pyracantha: Tolerates very hard pruning.
  • Western Red Cedar (Thuja species): Tolerates relatively hard pruning (on of the few
  • coniferous tree species that does).
  • Yew (Taxus baccata): Tolerates relatively hard pruning.
  • Informal hedges

Evergreen hedges

  • Berberis darwinii: Immediately after flowering
  • Cotoneaster lacteus: After fruiting
  • Escallonia: Immediately after flowering
  • Lavandula (lavender): Immediately after flowering
  • Pittosporum: Late summer
  • Pyracantha: Late summer Deciduous hedges
  • Berberis thunbergii: Immediately after flowering
  • Forsythia: After flowering, remove some older stems
  • Fuchsia magellanica: In spring, remove old stems
  • Rosa rugosa: In spring, remove thin twigs

Hedge maintenance tips

  • Prune those plants that flower on the current season’s growth, like as Fuchsia, once in spring, as they will still be able to produce flowers that year.
  • For plants that flower on one-year-old growth like Pittosporum, reduce the current season’s growth by half in summer.
  • In the case of shrubs that produce berries, such as Cotoneaster and Pyracantha, delay trimming until the berries disappear.